New short story coming in April

“The Unknown Thing” will soon appear in Beneath the Waves – Tales from the Deep, the next volume from Steve Dillon’s Things in the Well anthology series. Fans of my previously published short story, “Fischer’s Mouth” (Hinnom Magazine Issue 004, Dec 2017) might recognize this new story’s setting: the mighty river that runs through Augustus Valley, West Virginia. Can anyone bear witness to what sleeps beneath those churning waves and live?

BeneathTheWaves FB Banner

Beneath the Waves will be available this April. Keep an eye out on my blog, the Things in the Well website, and their Facebook Page for more news and illustrations that will be included in the anthology. Until then, check out the rad cover and peruse the TOC:

beneath20the20waves20wrapover20cover

contents-1

 

Advertisements

Link to: Horror Sampler Platter: January — Ghastly Grinning

Ryan Daley from Ghastly Grinning recently posted a friendly mention and review of “Fischer’s Mouth”, published in last December’s Hinnom Magazine. Click on the link for the full post and learn about some other good short horror fiction. Please go to their website to like and share the original post.

A new column here at Ghastly Grinning has our own Ryan Daley showcasing select horror shorts.

[…]

Fischer’s Mouth

Timothy G. Huguenin

Hinnom Magazine; Issue 4; December 2017; edited by C.P. Dunphey

Poor Fischer.  Every Spring a bright red mouth with big front teeth sprouts out of his forearm.  It disappears after about a week, so he simply tolerates its presence, covering it up with long sleeves like you would a regrettable tattoo.  […]

Source: Horror Sampler Platter: January — Ghastly Grinning

New short story publication and interview – “Fischer’s Mouth”

Howdy everyone!

I’ve been a little slow on my blogging game (what’s new), and though I’ve lazily reblogged the announcements from over at Gehenna and Hinnom Books, I haven’t taken the time to personally tell you about my new short story, “Fischer’s Mouth”, that appears in December’s Hinnom Magazine Issue 004.

It is a pretty weird story, one of the strangest I’ve written so far. Of course I’m not going to give much away. However, I did talk a little bit about the story and what inspired it in a recent Author Spotlight interview with G&H, which you can find here:

https://gehennaandhinnom.wordpress.com/2017/12/29/author-spotlight-timothy-g-huguenin/

Grab Hinnom Magazine in Kindle or Paperback by clicking the image below:


Read “A True Artisan” on HorrorAddicts.net #NGHW

Howdy! Most of you know by now I’m competing in the Next Great Horror Writer Contest by HorrorAddicts.net this year. As part of the application, I had to enter a 100 word horror story. You can go over to their website now and read all of the entries, including mine, “A True Artisan”.

Click on the banner below:

nghwcontest1

If you’re into podcasts, you can also follow the contest’s progress by subscribing to their podcast. Episode 1 of this season is up!

 

 

Get #Superheroes TCA Anthology V3 today!

TCA Anthology V3 Ad Panel (Post).png

My short story, “The Bald Man”, can be found only in The Crossover Alliance’s new anthology, Superheroes, which is out TODAY! You can order digital editions in almost any format directly from them, or you can find the paperback and kindle version from Amazon. Nook lovers out there, you’re not left out in the cold, either. Barnes and Noble has the epub, as well as the paperback, if you want to get it there.

Short on cash? Enter the rafflecopter giveaway, and you might win a free digital copy of this anthology, plus even more!

Like to listen to stories? The Untold Podcast has a free audio edition of one of the stories in this anthology, “The Trojan Initiative” by Clayton Webb.

For more information on The Crossover Alliance and what kind of books they publish, click on their logo below:

ATT00001

Hemingway vs. Bradbury

I mentioned in a previous post that I had a goal of finishing both The Complete Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway and Bradbury Stories: 100 of His Most Celebrated Tales over the course of the year by reading at least two stories from each per week. So far I’ve read ten from Hemingway and eleven from Bradbury, so I’m ahead of my goal.

I’m not totally inexperienced with either of these writers, though I’ll admit to not having investigated their work as much as I should have. Before this year, I had read Hemingway’s For Whom the Bell Tolls, The Old Man and the Sea, a handful of his short stories, and Ernest Hemingway On Writing, a book published posthumously collecting a bunch of quotes about writing he made over the course of his career. For Ray, it was Fahrenheit 451 (an inevitable favorite, as I’m a huge dystopian fan AND a huge book fan, so there you go) and Something Wicked This Way Comes (in which I was a little disappointed, I’m afraid).

The title of this post is “Hemingway vs. Bradbury.” Of course it really isn’t fair to pit the writers against one another, but of course going into a book you can’t help but have certain expectations. And one of those expectations I had was that Hemingway’s stories would be “better” literature than Bradbury’s, while Bradbury’s would be more fun to read. I was wrong (about the first assumption).

Hemingway is a master at inner conflict, human nature (emphasis on the man), and epiphany, of course, but none of his stories have floored me yet like Bradbury’s. “Lafayette, Farewell” and “The Rocket” nearly brought me to tears (okay okay, “The Rocket” really did bring me to tears…). Of course, to be great, a story has to do more than engage your emotions in some way, but it should do at least that, and while Hemingway’s whole shtick is melancholy and beautiful prose, Bradbury’s got ’em both in spades, as well as joy and the fantastical, whimsy and humanity. No disrespect to Papa, either, because he certainly deserves it. But I definitely went into Bradbury with my expectations inappropriately low. He’s amazing.

poland-1449053_1920

Dark Horizons available now

Now available on Amazon: Dark Horizons: An Anthology of Dark Science Fiction edited by Charles P. Zaglanis, published by Elder Signs Press, and featuring short fiction by—guess who—me!—among other very talented writers. And though I haven’t been able to confirm this for myself, as the closest one is over 300 miles from me, Zaglanis announced on his Facebook page a while back that Barnes & Noble has agreed to stock the book in their stores.

I’m proud to have my story “Drifting Into the Black” reprinted in this very nice volume next to other good fiction by various authors, including James Dorr. Everyone, please get a copy for yourself!